Chronicle AM: OR Top Cops Want Defelonization, SC County Wants to Jail Overdosers, More… (9/27/16)

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NORML updates its congressional scorecard, Bay State legalizers cry foul over a misleading voter guide, the number of babies suffering from opioid withdrawals has jumped dramatically, Oregon top cops want to defelonize simple drug possession, and more.

Oregon sheriffs and police chiefs jointly call for defelonizing simple drug possession. (Creative Commons)

Marijuana Policy

NORML Releases Updated and Revised 2016 Congressional Scorecard. To mark national Voter Registration Day, NORML has released its updated and revised guide to members of Congress. The guide gives letter grades to our representatives based on the comments and voting records. Only 22 of the 535 senators and congressmen got “A” grades, while 32 members got an “F” grade.

Massachusetts Legalizers Cry Foul Over State-Issued Voter Guide. Campaigners behind the Question 4 legalization initiative say a state-issued guide sent to voters across the state inaccurately describes the fiscal consequences of the measure. The guide says they are “difficult to project due to lack of reliable data” and cites a report from a committee headed by a top opponent of legalization to the effect that taxes and fee revenues from legal marijuana sales “may fall short of even covering the full public and social costs. The Yes on 4 campaign points out that there is “reliable data” from legal marijuana states and that those states have easily covered administrative and other expenses.

Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Study: Number of Babies Born Suffering Withdrawal Symptoms More Than Doubles in Four Years. Researchers studying neonatal abstinence syndrome, which results from withdrawal from opioids to which fetuses were exposed in utero, report that the incidence of the syndrome has jumped from 2.8 cases per thousand live births in 2009 to 7.3 cases in 2013. At least some of the surge may be a result of drug policies aimed at cracking down on prescription drug use. “The drug policies of the early 2000s were effective in reducing supply — we have seen a decrease in methamphetamine abuse and there have been reductions in some aspects of prescription drug abuse,” said lead study author Dr. Joshua Brown. “However, the indirect results, mainly the increase in heroin abuse, were likely not anticipated and we are just starting to see these.” The researchers also noted wide variations by state, from 0.7 cases per thousand in Hawaii to 33.4 cases in West Virginia.

New Psychoactive Substances

Bill to Criminalize More New Synthetics Passes House. A bill sponsored by Rep. Charlie Dent (R-TX) to add several new synthetic cannabinoids and opioids to the Controlled Substances Act passed the House Monday. The measure, HB 3537, now goes to the Senate.

Law Enforcement

Oregon Law Enforcement Calls for Defelonizing Drug Possession. The Oregon Association of Police Chiefs and the Oregon State Sheriff’s Association have jointly called for people caught with “user amounts” of illegal drugs to face misdemeanor charges — not felonies — and be sent to treatment. Elected officials and prosecutors should “craft a more thoughtful approach to drug possession when it is the only crime committed,” the top cops said, because felony charges “include unintended and collateral consequences including barriers to housing and employment and a disparate impact on minority communities.”

South Carolina County Ponders Mandatory Jail Time for People Who Overdose. The chairman of the county council in Horry County, where Myrtle Beach is located, has inquired during a council meeting about whether to make people who suffer opioid overdoses spend three days in jail. Chairman Mark Lazarus would also like to see mandatory drug treatment required. He added that jailing people who overdose wouldn’t discourage them from getting medical help because they’re usually unconscious and someone else calls for emergency assistance.



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